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Eduardo Gallo-Cajiao
 
Ed Bio photo

Eduardo Gallo-Cajiao

Ed is a PhD student working on global governance for conserving migratory shorebirds under the supervision of Rich Fuller, Tiffany Morrison, and Salit Kark. Migratory species often require vast areas spanning multiple countries to complete their life cycle. In this context, various transnational institutional arrangements have emerged with relevance to their conservation. Shorebirds in Asia-Pacific, a region that has become to be known as the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, migrate across 22 countries. Despite the existence of an international policy framework for their conservation, their populations have continued to decline. Hence, appraising the effectiveness of such arrangements is paramount to inform conservation policy and practice. I am particularly interested in understanding the implementation of bilateral agreements, the role of non-state actors, and the performance of institutional arrangements on the ground .

Email: e.gallocajiao@uq.edu.au
ResearcherID Profile: Click here
Location: Rm 506A, Goddard Building 8

 

 

Brief Biography

Ed completed his undergraduate studies at “Universidad del Valle”, in his native Colombia, and a Master of Environmental Science at Macquarie University. He has accrued over 6 years of experience working in biodiversity conservation with government and the non-for-profit sector in Colombia and Australia.

Qualifications

2009 Environmental Science (MSc), Macquarie University
2004 Biological Sciences, BSc (Hons), Universidad del Valle (Colombia)

Journal publications (selected)

1. Gallo-Cajiao, E. 2014. Evidence is required to address potential albatross mortality in the New South Wales Ocean Trawl fishery. Pacific Conservation Biology 20: 245-252.

2. Idrobo, C. J. and E. Gallo-Cajiao. 2008. Oak flowers and Blackburnian Warblers (Dendroica fusca): opportunistic flower consumption by an insectivorous bird. Ornitologia Colombiana 6: 78-81.

Proceeding articles

1. Gallo-Cajiao, E. and C. J. Idrobo. 2004. Subandean forest fragments and bird conservation: a case study (published in Spanish). Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Wildlife Management in the Amazon and Latin America: 169-176.

2. Idrobo, C. J. and E. Gallo-Cajiao. 2004. Understory bird mobility between forest fragments in a Subandean landscape (published in Spanish). Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Wildlife Management in the Amazon and Latin America: 183-193.

Contributed chapters (selected)

1. Gallo-Cajiao, E. and M. Moreno-Palacios. 2014. Rufous-crested Tanager, Creurgops verticalis (published in Spanish). Pp. 288-290. In: Renjifo, L. M., Gomez, M. F., Velasquez-Tibata, J., Amaya-Villareal, A. M., Kattan, G. H., Amaya-Espinel, J. D. and J. Burbano-Giron. Red Data Book of Birds of Colombia, Volume I. Editorial Universidad Javeriana. Bogota, Colombia.

2. Idrobo, C. J., E. Gallo-Cajiao and O. Jahn. 2006. Baudo Guan (Penelope ortoni). Pp. 45-48 In: Brooks, D. M. (ed). Conserving Cracids: the most threatened family of birds in the Americas. Misc. Publ. Houston Mus. Nat. Sci., No. 6. Houston, TX. USA.

3. Gallo-Cajiao, E. and C. J. Idrobo-Medina. 2003. An interpretation of our natural heritage based on urban surrounding forests (published in Spanish). Pp. 181-203 In: Z. Días & S. Hernández (eds). An Alternative Approach to Heritage. Universidad del Cauca. Popayán, Colombia.

Popular writing articles (selected)

1. Gallo-Cajiao, E. 2013. Restoring Rio (the history and birds of Tijuca National Park). Australian Birdlife 2: 48-51.

2. Gallo-Cajiao, E. 2012. Marine debris: a story of combs, elephants and our oceans. Nature New South Wales 56: 16-17.

3. Gallo-Cajiao, E. 2012. The Red-necked Stint. Nature New South Wales 56: 26-27.

Awards

1. 2013. Everyone’s Environment Grant. $40,000. Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection.
2. 2009. Stuart Leslie Bird Research Award. $500. Birdlife Australia.
3. 2009. Outstanding performance. Broome Bird Observatory.
4. 2008. Research Sponsorship. $1,500. The Australian Geographic Society.
5. 2008. Research Grant. $1,500. New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service.
6. 2007. Travel Grant. $1,000. Macquarie University.
7. 2005. Best oral presentation. “Ecuadorian Ornithological Meeting”.
8. 2002. Research Grant. $450. Idea Wild Biodiversity & Conservation Organization, US.